Friday, 2 March 2018

Vituary - Jeff Haley

Jeff Haley

I first met Jeff Haley when a friend brought him to my bff’s birthday party.  He had long hair, was wearing a band hoodie (if I remember correctly), and didn’t say much.  Obviously, my brain told me that I wasn’t cool enough to talk to him.

It’s been, like…..twelve? or so years since that party.  And I’m still not cool enough to talk to Jeff Haley.  But, God love’em, he talks to me anyway!

Like a true BAMF, Jeff lives in Qatar, has an awesome job, travels the world, meets new people, and grows his own mah’fuggin’ veggies.

He’s as genuine a person as you’ll ever meet and he attracts new friends as if he’s a human friend magnet.  He’s kind and giving and sincere, and anybody who knows him can certainly attest to that!

Jeff, man!  It’s so awesome to see you living life to the fullest.  Most people should really take a page out of your book and start grabbin’ life by the you-know-whats (myself included).  You’re a super cool dude with a super cool attitude and it’s just super cool to know you.





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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  

Tuesday, 27 February 2018

Vituary - Hilary Alteen

Hilary Alteen

 I met Hilary in elementary school.  She wasn’t in my circle of friends, but I liked her an awful lot (still do!).

Hilary was the type of girl that could be classified as weird, solely for the fact that she liked what she liked and didn’t care how that made her look.  I can’t tell you how much I admired that.

I remember one time in particular, in Grade 6, we had a gym class outside in the field behind our school. 


Some backstory: I started shaving my legs in Grade 5 because I thought it would make me cooler (ha, it did… for about a month).  I had to figure out how to tell my step-mom about it, so I decided to grow out my leg hair, pretend I hadn’t shaved my legs before, and then ask my step-mom about how to shave my legs for the first time (for some reason I thought she’d be mad if she knew I’d done it already).   Taking a page out of the Hilary Alteen book of “Do It ‘Cause You Like It”, I wore a skort to school while I was growing out the hair on my legs.  It was a cute skort, dammit!  I wanted to wear it, leg hair or not!  But my friends weren’t long making me feel embarrassed for doing so. 

ANYWAY, outside in the field, I noticed Hilary in her shorts, running around with her pals, leg hair majestically blowing in the wind, and I thought “God damn, I need confidence like that and I need friends like those.”

Hilary has grown into an amazing person, but she hasn’t lost that amazing eccentricity that makes her so adorably Hilary.  She lives her life for her, not for ‘Likes’ on Facebook, not for followers on Instagram; she does what makes her happy because it makes her happy.  She lives her life the way I wish I had the confidence to live mine.


Hilary, it’s been a long, long time.  We didn’t speak much in our later school years, but I never stopped admiring you.  You are an incredible person and I’m so delighted to see the person you’ve become.




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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  

Tuesday, 5 December 2017

Vituary - Julie Smith

Julie Smith

Anybody who is part of a blended family (my mom would correct me right now and say “it’s a blending family, because it’s always a work in progress,” and she’s right), knows how tough it is to grow up in a house with people who are not part of your biological family.

However, it helps when some of those people are like Julie.

I spent the better part of my teenage years trying to be like Julie.  I colored my hair and stole her clothes and listened to the same music she did.  Even still, I knew there was no way I’d be as cool as Julie Smith.  I mean, c’maan.

Part of what makes Julie so awesome is her love of life.  She loves a cold beer and a good party.  She also appreciates a long hike and a breathtaking sunset.

Julie is heart-wrenchingly proud of her roots; she’s a Newfie to her core, which is something my dad adored about her (as do I). 

Most admirable of all, perhaps, is her enthusiasm for her role in taking care of two of the most wonderful little girls I’ve ever met, as well as the love she shares with Allan (that we all can’t stop swooning over).

Bottom line, Julie Smith is a kickass human who is as beautiful on the inside as she is on the outside.  She has a gargantuan heart, an infectious laugh, and the best collection of band shirts in NL.


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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  


Monday, 4 December 2017

Vituary - Cara Winsor Hehir

Cara Winsor Hehir

Cara’s beautiful face is one many NL comedy fans are familiar with.  She’s also no stranger to the RPM challenge and has proven that she is as musically talented as she is hilarious.

Cara certainly isn’t shy; she isn’t afraid to voice her opinions, no matter how unpopular they may be (though, her opinions tend to be popular among the crowd with their heads on straight), which is a trait most of us wish we had.

Amid her bold opinions and perhaps somewhat vulgar (but side-splitting) jokes, Cara’s got a heart of gold.  If you need it and she’s got it, you better believe she’ll give it to ya.

There’s no question in my mind that Cara would put herself out to help another, and that’s why we all share such a deep love and respect for her.

If you ever have the opportunity to catch Cara in a local comedy show, do not pass up the opportunity.  In the meantime, you can check out her musical chops and some of her never-ending wit on her YouTube page


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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”