Tuesday, 5 December 2017

Vituary - Julie Smith

Julie Smith

Anybody who is part of a blended family (my mom would correct me right now and say “it’s a blending family, because it’s always a work in progress,” and she’s right), knows how tough it is to grow up in a house with people who are not part of your biological family.

However, it helps when some of those people are like Julie.

I spent the better part of my teenage years trying to be like Julie.  I colored my hair and stole her clothes and listened to the same music she did.  Even still, I knew there was no way I’d be as cool as Julie Smith.  I mean, c’maan.

Part of what makes Julie so awesome is her love of life.  She loves a cold beer and a good party.  She also appreciates a long hike and a breathtaking sunset.

Julie is heart-wrenchingly proud of her roots; she’s a Newfie to her core, which is something my dad adored about her (as do I). 

Most admirable of all, perhaps, is her enthusiasm for her role in taking care of two of the most wonderful little girls I’ve ever met, as well as the love she shares with Allan (that we all can’t stop swooning over).

Bottom line, Julie Smith is a kickass human who is as beautiful on the inside as she is on the outside.  She has a gargantuan heart, an infectious laugh, and the best collection of band shirts in NL.


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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  


Monday, 4 December 2017

Vituary - Cara Winsor Hehir

Cara Winsor Hehir

Cara’s beautiful face is one many NL comedy fans are familiar with.  She’s also no stranger to the RPM challenge and has proven that she is as musically talented as she is hilarious.

Cara certainly isn’t shy; she isn’t afraid to voice her opinions, no matter how unpopular they may be (though, her opinions tend to be popular among the crowd with their heads on straight), which is a trait most of us wish we had.

Amid her bold opinions and perhaps somewhat vulgar (but side-splitting) jokes, Cara’s got a heart of gold.  If you need it and she’s got it, you better believe she’ll give it to ya.

There’s no question in my mind that Cara would put herself out to help another, and that’s why we all share such a deep love and respect for her.

If you ever have the opportunity to catch Cara in a local comedy show, do not pass up the opportunity.  In the meantime, you can check out her musical chops and some of her never-ending wit on her YouTube page


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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  

Monday, 18 September 2017

Vituary - Kimberley Parsons

Kimberley Parsons

 Where do I even start?

I met Kim when I started working at CNA.  Obviously, I was super intimidated by her because she was friggin’ beautiful and had legs for days.  The more I worked with her, the more we realized how similar we are.

If you know Kim, you know she’s the youngest thirty-something-year-old you’ll meet.  She’s always up for adventures, she has the greatest sense of humour, and she always looks for the silver lining which is something most of us lack the willpower to do these days.

Kim is the type of person to put herself out in order to make someone else’s life easier.  She’s so giving and so genuine that the world would be an amazing place if we had the ability to clone her.

 She’s also got a brain on her like nobody else.  Whether it’s school, finances, love, or just general life bullsh*t, she’s always my first call when I have a question or need some advice.

Without question, Kim is one of the absolute best people on this planet and I feel so lucky that she considers me one of her best friends.

And if you haven’t
tasted the Christmas Crack that this Amazonian Goddess can whip up, you’re not living a full life.

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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  

Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Vituary - Marion Biles

Marion Biles

When I started working at CNA, I didn’t expect to meet anyone that I’d love as much as I love Marion.

Marion is the loveliest, sweetest, and most genuine person I’ve ever met.  She is so incredibly easy to talk to and she goes out of her way to make everyone around her feel comfortable.



Marion never has a bad word to say about anyone and I bet you’ll never find anyone with a bad word to stay about her either.

Her laugh brightens up a room and her smile could turn the coldest heart to warm mush.

Anyone who knows Marion knows how lucky they are to have her in their life.  She is reliable, compassionate, and wonderful in every possible way.
And she makes a damn beautiful bride.





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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."



While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”